Here's a bird's-eye view of utter and near-total destruction.

This four-minute-long video, shot from a helicopter over the Bahamas on Tuesday, captured the carnage left behind by Hurricane Dorian.

Heartbreaking images of roof-less homes, fallen walls, toppled trees, flooded streets, front yards filled with water and debris and cars strewn about will greet evacuated homeowners upon their return to neighborhoods.

It won't be business as usual for a long time to come, as the video shows flipped container ports and trucks discarded like children's toys. Major buildings have been reduced to mere concrete and rebar in what had been busy commercial districts, the video showed.

Prime Minister Hubert Minnis told reporters on Tuesday night that he had toured Abaco Island and that the airport was underwater, with the runway completely flooded.

"The area around the airport now looks like a lake," said Minnis, who added: "We are in the midst of the greatest national crisis in our country's history.

Two more people died at hospitals, he said, raising the confirmed death toll to seven.

A photo from a next-generation satellite, bottom, gave a first look at heavy flooding across the Bahamas from Hurricane Dorian. Google Earth / ICEYE

It won't be business as usual for a long time to come, as the video shows flipped container ports and trucks discarded like children's toys. Major buildings have been reduced to mere concrete and rebar in what had been busy commercial districts, the video showed.

Prime Minister Hubert Minnis told reporters on Tuesday night that he had toured Abaco Island and that the airport was underwater, with the runway completely flooded.

"The area around the airport now looks like a lake," said Minnis, who added: "We are in the midst of the greatest national crisis in our country's history.

Two more people died at hospitals, he said, raising the confirmed death toll to seven.

"It's total devastation. It's decimated. Apocalyptic. It looks like a bomb went off," hurricane relief organizer Lia Head-Rigby said after she flew over the Bahamas' hard-hit Abaco Island.

"It's not rebuilding something that was there. We have to start again."

One element of Bahamian life that might have escaped major damage was the country's golf courses, as one set of links appeared to be almost untouched in this video — although a fleet of nearby carts was destroyed.