At an age where many of her peers are learning to drive or getting a driver’s license for the first time, Hailie not only has been driving race cars and off-road vehicles for nearly a decade, she also has become one of the rising young female stars in NASCAR racing:

  • In late September, she became the first woman to win a NASCAR K&N Pro Series West race (Meridian Speedway in Meridian, Idaho).
  • In so doing, she became only the second female race winner in NASCAR history, joining Shawna Robinson, who won three races in 1988 and 1989 in the now-defunct NASCAR Dash Series.
  • Hailie wrapped up the season by winning K&N Pro Series West rookie of the year honors, finishing fifth in the final standings.
  • Early last month, the Temecula, California, native was named to Forbes magazine’s “Women In Sports to Watch in 2019.”

And now Hailie has her sites set on not only winning more races in 2019, but also to capture the K&N West championship. If she does that, she’d add another page to her NASCAR history book, becoming the first female champion in any NASCAR series.

“I’m not done, I still have so much more to accomplish,” Hailie told NBC Sports. “It’s like there’s a ladder and this is the first step up the ladder.

“You don’t feel accomplished when you get that first step on the ladder. You feel accomplished when you’re on top of the ladder. I want to be on top, and I’m going to do everything in my ability to get there.”

A straight-A, home-schooled student who graduated high school at 16, Hailie begins her second full season in the K&N Series on Sunday at New Smyrna Speedway (to air on NBCSN on Feb. 13 at 6 pm ET), just a few miles from where she hopes to race one day: Daytona International Speedway. Hailie drives for one of the most successful K&N teams, Bill McAnally Racing, with primary sponsorship from NAPA Auto Parts and Toyota.

“I don’t want to be cocky, but I want to win a championship and feel that with my team, I have the ability,” Hailie said.

When Hailie and her team arrived last September to race at Meridian Speedway — a quarter-mile paved oval — she had already compiled two runner-up results and seven other top-10 finishes in her first 11 starts (she finished the K&N West season with 12 top 10s in 14 starts).

But she was hungry for that elusive first win.

“We just really had to find what worked for me, what crew guys worked well with me and who didn’t,” Hailie said. “I think we figured that out halfway through the season, and from that point we were running in the top three or top five almost every single race.”

Hailie and her team felt so confident about the Idaho race that they broke into song and dance before the race to Hailie’s favorite song, Eminem’s “Slim Shady”, to get pumped up. It’s a habit she picked up from her motorcycle and off-road racer father Brian Deegan, who also listens to music to motivate himself before his own races. One of Hailie’s crew members brought a portable speaker to continue playing the song as the team paraded and pushed her car onto the starting grid.

Hailie started fourth and stayed in the top five the entire race. On the final lap, she applied a textbook bump-and-run to then-teammate Cole Rouse two turns from the finish line and sailed past to capture the checkered flag and put her name in NASCAR’s history books.

The winning maneuver was not a happenstance move.

“We went into that race with aggressive intentions,” Brian Deegan said. “We knew it was a short track, flat, so we went to the go-kart track and practiced bump-and-runs. We must have practiced 1,000 of them.

“It’s a fair race move, you just have to perfect it so you don’t knock a guy out. We went into that race and planned to do that move. When it came down to the last lap, I was like, ‘Hailie, you know what to do. We can make friends later.’”

While Rouse was initially upset that Hailie knocked him out of the way, he quickly cheered her for such a big achievement.

Hailie’s fellow teammate at Bill McAnally Racing, Derek Kraus, is also 17 and entering his third year in K&N competition with BMR. He’s watched Hailie develop.

“She shows a lot on the racetrack,” Kraus said. “She adapted to it really well and really fast, too. It takes other drivers a little longer than what it took her to get used to K&N cars. It’s way different from what people expect. It’s a heavier stock car, you definitely have to know what you’re doing. She’s worked her tail off to get where she is.”

Kraus, of Stratford, Wisconsin, admires Hailie not just for her ability on the track, but also her demeanor off it.

“She always seems to be in a happy mood and is uplifting,” Kraus said. “She’s never down, no matter how bad the night is or what happens in the racetrack. I think I’ve only seen her mad just once, and that’s pretty good for a whole season. She’s a good teammate to have around because she’s always happy and laughing.”

Kraus noted that it doesn’t make a difference that Hailie is a female. Once she straps into her car, she’s a racer first and foremost.

“Her being a girl or being my age, once you put that helmet on, everyone’s the same, everyone’s equal,” Kraus said. “No matter if you’re driving against a 15-year-old or a 40-year-old, you’ll never know the difference once you get that helmet on.”

Hailie got the racing bug from her father, Brian, one of the most successful freestyle motocross riders in the U.S. and most decorated rider in X Games history.

“My dad has pretty much taught me, he’s built this thing with me, he trains with me, practices with me, goes to the gym with me, we battle each other at the go-kart track,” Hailie said of her father. “We’re so competitive with each other and I feel like we both make each other better because we’re so hard on each other, just trying to be the best we can.”

Brian and Marissa Deegan have three children, all who have become racers. Hailie is the oldest, while 12-year-old brother Haiden is a multi-motocross champion, and 8-year-old brother Hudson is competing in both motocross and karts.

But it’s Hailie that has been the biggest chip off the old block racing-wise so far.

“I tried to teach her all my tricks and everything it takes to win and the ability to learn on her own,” Brian Deegan said. “My goal is one day (she) will surpass me.

“Hailie rode dirt bikes when she was little, which I thought was a good foundation for her to start on. But when it comes to girls in motorsports, in my opinion, the reality is there’s a lot more opportunities on four wheels than two.

“So (racing cars) is something we worked towards. It’s not by accident. Ever since she was eight years old, she’s been racing with me. About 2009, we got her into racing trucks, and go-karts, dirt, off-road karts. Each year she got better. Then she started winning races and started winning championships and it started snowballing from there.”

By the time she was 12 years old, Hailie told her parents she was ready to go all-in as a race car driver.

“That’s when I thought this is going to be her path,” Brian Deegan said. “It really wasn’t just our decision, it was something she wanted to do, and that’s kind of where it started.

“We’re excited to conquer this sport as a family and win the fans over. Hailie is what you see is what you get. She’s not putting on a front. She’s giggly, fun, no bad bones in her body. I don’t think I’ve ever heard her say a bad word. We’re very fortunate.”

Hailie is serious about everything she does racing-wise. That includes how she revels in beating her father in regular go-kart races they compete in against each other – with a lot of good-natured trash talking between them.

“We go and have the gnarliest battles out there; we’ve actually totaled a couple karts,” Hailie said with a giggle.

Brian Deegan also laughs about some of the on-track battles he’s had with his daughter.

“Usually, that’s where you start blaming the cars or tires, the kind of standard excuse by racers,” Brian Deegan said. “You can always find an excuse. We definitely talk crap to each other and give each other a hard time on who’s faster. That’s friendly competition, it’s what keeps you pushing to be better.

“Every day we talk about racing, every day we talk about strategy, why, how we’re going to win, who we’re going to beat and how are we going to do it. That’s a daily deal that we’ve done.”

It’s not every day that a lower-rung NASCAR race can be life-changing, but it certainly was in Hailie’s case. Not only did her victory in Idaho affirm that she could win a race, the national attention she’s received since might be a lot for another 17-year-old, but not her.

“At the beginning of last year, I was just completely lost,” Hailie said. “I didn’t really know what I’m doing, I’m still learning, I didn’t know where my place is in the stock car world. I was just lost. I didn’t know the terms about the car, didn’t know what to change, and then about halfway through the season, it just clicked and everything just fell into place.

“Ever since then we started running up front every single race. Coming into this year, I feel a lot more confident in myself. I know I have the abilities, I know my place, I know what to do now, I know what to work on and I know my strengths and weaknesses.

“As soon as last season ended, I was ready for it to start back up again. I’d say, ‘How many more months to go?’ I’ve literally been counting the days. I hate the off-season.”

In just a few days, she’ll be back in the driver’s seat at New Smyrna.

Much like what Kraus, her teammate said, Hailie’s competitiveness rises to the surface in races. But out of her race car, she has not let the success and celebrity get to her.

“There’s nothing I hate more than an over-cocky person,” she said. “I have friends that’ll be all cocky and then go out and get their butt whooped. They’re the worst.

“I don’t try to call stuff before it happens because in the end, it’s not always going to happen. I’d rather be humble and wait for myself to succeed and then take it all in from there.”

While Hailie wants to win a championship, she remains grounded. Her maturity, savviness and philosophy belie her youth.

“My dad has kept me real good at just focusing on racing,” Hailie said. “In the end, success comes with results, and you’ll get everything with results, so let’s just make it easy and get right to the point and get those results.”

Hailie achieved all her goals last season. For 2019, she hopes to earn at least three more K&N West wins and one in the K&N East Series (which she will run select races) in 2019, along with the West championship.

Where would she go from there?

“The best is yet to come,” Brian Deegan said of his daughter. “We’re just starting. We’re just getting in it. She has a legitimate chance of being the first girl to win a NASCAR championship, and that could happen this year.”