The Hamilton County Department of Education hopes a new position will help close communications gaps that may have contributed to the Woodmore bus crash.

Channel 3 learned more about the new job that will include taking complaints from bus riders and drivers and address them before a crash takes place.

Applications have not been taken yet because the county budget has to be approved first to pay for the new position.

Newly released documents show Johnthony Walker submitted student discipline referrals three separate times when he was a Hamilton County school bus driver.

READ MORE | NTSB releases findings in Woodmore bus crash investigation

Less than two weeks before the Woodmore crash, he complained about ten students standing while the bus was moving.

"When he made several of those, the school's response was to tell him he can't keep issuing so many referrals and that's when we observed that he began doing things that were unsafe to control some of the behavior,” Kenny Bragg of the NTSB said.

Documents from the NTSB show Walker was worried the students could get hurt if he had to brake unexpectedly.

READ MORE | UPDATE: NTSB recommends adding seat belts to all school buses

Hamilton County's transportation supervisor at the time said he understood the concerns, but that Walker "can't be turning in 10 referrals in a day."

"One of the issues he would have is students wouldn't sit down when this bus was in motion. His response was either to swerve or slam on brakes causing the students to fall and a way to urge them to be seated,” Bragg said.

Durham began investigating complaints from students about Walker swerving just five days before the deadly crash.

READ MORE | Continuing coverage of the Woodmore bus crash

Documents said Durham's terminal manager started reviewing bus video, but was sick and did not finish that process until after the crash. It's one reason why the federal agency recommended more accountability for school districts and school bus contractors.

Since the crash, Durham created a system that records and tracks complaints to help respond to them faster.

Durham and the school system also said drivers are encouraged to document student behavior issues and submit them to their offices.