UPDATE: New holding company takes over contracts of Wichman Monu - WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

UPDATE: New holding company takes over contracts of Wichman Monuments

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CHATTANOOGA, TN (WRCB) -

UPDATE: A new company is taking over Wichman Monuments and said it plans to help its clients. However, the new company, A&R Holdings LLC, was only established a few days ago

Wichman Monuments closed its doors after the company took payments from customers but never delivered memorials.

Caleb Dean lost his brother about a year ago. His grave-site is still without a stone.

"Me, and my mother, and some family have just flowers and some things like that. Just a few little decorations," Dean said about his brother’s grave-site.

Dean is one of dozens of people who paid Wichman Monuments for a stone that was never delivered. He paid nearly $2,000.

"There's no amount of words really to put with it because it still leaves that whole and that void in your heart that's not filled yet," said Dean.

Wichman Monuments closed its doors in early march. 

Friday, Presley law firm sent a statement saying A&R holdings is taking over the company and its accounts. It says the company will contact local businesses for help with completing as many orders as possible, and refund customers if their orders can't be finished.

“A&R Holdings, LLC will contact area monument manufacturers to discuss arrangements for the completion of as many customer orders as possible and plans to refund contract prices to those customers whose orders cannot be completed.”

Presley law firm is representing *both* companies.

Records show A & R holdings obtained its business license with the state of Tennessee just 4 days ago, on March 19th. Presley law firm would not release the name of the new business owners.

Dean said he will get his brothers headstone, whether it's with this company or not.
"It's too little too late. The damage has been done," said Dean.

A&R holdings says it hopes to complete all orders in the next 6 months. 


PREVIOUS STORY: A holding company has taken over the contracts held by a now-closed monument company, according to lawyers who represent the owners.

Wichman Monuments, which closed several weeks ago amid a number of customers who said the owners did not fulfill their obligations for burial headstones, has been taken over by A&R Holdings, LLC.

The agreement will transfer substantially all the assets to A&R. 

They will "contact area monument manufacturers to discuss arrangements for the completion of as many customer orders as possible and plans to refund contract prices to those customers whose orders cannot be completed," according to a news release.

Terrance Jones, associate attorney with the Presley Law Firm said, “As I’ve heard from Wichman Monument customers over the past two weeks, I’ve heard and understand that the primary complaint is uncertainty. They just don’t know what is going to happen next regarding the burial markers for their loved ones. It is Mr. Wichman’s hope, and mine, that A&R Holdings will be able to provide more stability regarding those orders and some comfort to the customers as we continue to work towards resolution of those customer accounts.”

The owners of A&R Holdings, LLC have asked to remain anonymous at this time.

For fastest response, customers who contact Presley Law Firm are asked to use email address settlement@presleylawfirm.com.


PREVIOUS STORY: Channel 3 has learned the owner of Wichman Monument, Trent Wichman, has faced financial challenges since 2015.

Public records show the IRS placed federal tax liens on the business property after Wichman failed to pay back taxes on the property.

READ MORE | UPDATE: Families outraged after Wichman Monuments closes their doors

Wichman paid off a nearly $55,000 lien last year. He still owes more than $10,000.

Wichman Monument made headlines this week after dozens of customers said they paid for headstones that were never delivered.

READ MORE | Companies helping customers of Wichman Monuments

The company closed Friday.

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