Bradley County church leaders learn about non-lethal weapons at - WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

Bradley County church leaders learn about non-lethal weapons at safety meeting

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BRADLEY COUNTY, TN (WRCB) -

Friday, there was another lesson in church safety in Bradley County.

This is the third class hosted by the sheriff's office since the deadly church shooting right outside of Nashville last September.

Deputies taught leaders how to develop a security team and different defense options.

The Bradley County Sheriff's Office has been teaching church leaders how to protect their members.

The most recent sessions talked about using non-lethal weapons.

“You don't really want to use mace especially in a congested area because you are going to affect more than one person versus a taser; you get a direct hit,” said Sheriff Eric Watson, Bradley County.

Doctor Allen Burnette is the pastor of Charity Baptist Church. He says he's been to every session.

“We've carried back to our own congregation of what to watch for in the red flags and things of that nature,” said Dr. Allen Burnette, Charity Baptist Church Pastor.

Steven Weber says attending the sessions as a church member is just as valuable.

“Getting the word out of how important it is that if there is an active shooter if you can get out and run if you can't do that then hide and be ready to fight,” said Steve Weber, Member of Philippi Baptist Church.

This training is designed to help protect church members in any emergency situation.

“If someone passes out, has a heart attack or stroke if someone were to come in with a gun we will address those issues,” said Sheriff Watson.

“Someone to come in and disrupt the church it may be that we have someone who has a mental problem what's the best way to deal with that person,” said Weber.

Leaders were also taught about getting safety liability through insurance.

Sheriff Watson says the next two meetings will be April 9 and April 30.

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