The false missile alert in Hawaii over the weekend had us wondering about what the emergency response plans are for communities right here in the Tennessee Valley.

READ MORE | Hawaii missile alert test goes wrong, terrifies the state

Channel 3 checked in with Wacker in Bradley County to find out what has changed after last year's chemical release and found that residents there are still unclear on how to respond in the event of another incident. 

"It exploded you know just a big boom," said neighbor Dewey Hughes.

Dewey Hughes says he will never forget the explosion at Wacker Chemie Plant that injured 12 people last September.  

He says he did not receive a shelter in place alert. It wasn't until he saw large plumes of vapor over the plant that he knew something was wrong. 

"We're less than a mile, the way the crow flies," said Hughes. "from where they exploded, we're right here." 

It's been more than four months since the incident. Hughes says he hasn't heard anything about what to do next time and he worries about another incident. 

When Channel 3 asked about updates to an emergency plan for residents in the area,

Wacker spokesperson, Lisa Mantooth said, "There's no update at this time." 

"I mean a siren close or yea flashing lights would work, a closer siren then theirs," said Hughes. 

On the heels of the incident, emergency management officials encouraged citizens to sign up for the county's emergency text messaging system "Nixle". 

In the event of an chemical plant emergency, officials say their instructions will be passed on through emergency alerts.

Evacuation plans would be created in the event of an emergency, taking into account weather and circumstance. 

"A lot of people around here is just farmers you know, several around here and they're like me they don't have that high tech equipment," said Hughes. "If they have a boom over there and it comes through our air conditioning system, you know we might not wake up...we don't know." 

In Bradley County, 23,106 people have signed up for emergency text alerts, which is 22% of the population. In Charleston, where Wacker is located, less than 400 people receive those alerts.

Bradley County's EMA director said he talks with Wacker's fire chief regularly about safety. County emergency officials have had several emergency drills with the plant. 

Wacker and the EMA director are working to get everyone who lives near the chemical plant signed up for their alert system.

To sign up, text CBCEMA to 888777.

If you live in Charleston, text CHARLESTON to 888777. 

You can also sign up for emergency robo calls, by calling the Bradley County Emergency Management Office at (423) 728-7289. 

Channel 3 reached out to the Tennessee Valley Authority.

TVA sends out detailed emergency response plans in the form of a calendar. It includes emergency supply checklists, evacuation routes and details on where to find iodine tablets to slow absorption.

Calendars are sent to all residents within a 10-mile radius of a nuclear plant.