Doctors identify brain abnormalities in Cuba attack patients - WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

Doctors identify brain abnormalities in Cuba attack patients

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WASHINGTON (AP) - The Associated Press has learned that doctors treating the U.S. Embassy victims of mysterious, invisible attacks in Cuba have discovered brain abnormalities as they search for clues to explain hearing, vision, balance and memory damage.
    
It's the most specific finding to date about physical damage. It shows that whatever harmed the Americans, it led to perceptible changes in their brains. The finding is also one of several factors fueling growing skepticism that some kind of sonic weapon was involved.
    
Several U.S. officials say medical testing has revealed the embassy workers developed changes to the white matter tracts that let different parts of the brain communicate. The officials described a growing consensus held by university and government physicians researching the attacks. They weren't authorized to discuss the investigation and demanded anonymity.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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