Hamilton County 911 dispatchers deployed to Florida to help with - WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

Hamilton County 911 dispatchers deployed to Florida to help with Hurricane Irma relief

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CHATTANOOGA, TN (WRCB) -

A team of Hamilton County 911 dispatchers is on the way to Florida to answer calls for help.

Six dispatchers left Chattanooga early Monday morning. They’re headed to Collier County, Florida for up to 14 days.

Dispatchers in the Naples area have been working long, hard hours with an increased call load and no relief since Hurricane Irma.

Hamilton County dispatchers will cover shifts and make sure Florida first responders get to the right place.

They’ll be working in a city they’re unfamiliar with and will rely on technology to do the job.

“Technology has come a long way.  The computer system we use and the mapping that goes with it make it a whole lot easier. The training is somewhat standardized. Our people are well trained. I know the people they're going to assist in Florida are as well and actually the center we're targeting now is very similar to ours in size and operation so I think they'll fit in very well,” said Jeff Carney, Director of Operations at the Hamilton County Emergency Communications Center.

Carney says it’s common to send dispatchers to help out in other 911 centers within Tennessee but it’s unusual to deploy them out of state.

This situation is an exception because the need is so great.

Dispatchers in Collier County, Florida has had some assistance from other dispatchers in Florida and Georgia but this is the first team of Tennessee 911 dispatchers to deploy to the state since Hurricane Irma, according to Carney.

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