Bryan College Lions Extend Lead In Bassmaster College National C - WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

Bryan College Lions Extend Lead In Bassmaster College National Championship

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Jake Lee (left) and Jacob Foutz of Bryan College maintain their lead on the second day of the 2017 Carhartt Bassmaster College Series National Championship presented by Bass Pro Shops on Lake Bemidj: Photo by Bri Douglas/B.A.S.S. Jake Lee (left) and Jacob Foutz of Bryan College maintain their lead on the second day of the 2017 Carhartt Bassmaster College Series National Championship presented by Bass Pro Shops on Lake Bemidj: Photo by Bri Douglas/B.A.S.S.

Jake Lee and Jacob Foutz of Bryan College not only held the top spot, but extended their lead at the Carhartt Bassmaster College Series National Championship presented by Bass Pro Shops on Lake Bemidji. They caught a two-day total of 34 pounds, 10 ounces of bass and hold a 4-13 lead over their nearest pursuer.
 
After coming to the scales on Thursday with only four fish, Lee and Foutz knew if they managed to get five bites that they would have the quality to back up their performance on the first day. Instead of coming up one fish short of their five-bass limit, they filled it and managed to accumulate their daily total of 18-4 before 10:45 a.m.
 
“We knew yesterday that today would be a better day because of the conditions,” Lee said. “Our area was blown out as soon as the day started on Thursday, so with hardly any wind today, we knew it would be fine.”
 
Lee and Foutz managed to find an area away from crowds of other anglers and where bass were willing to cooperate. They are the only team in the Top 12 that isn’t fishing the Stump Lake region of this fishery.
 
“The first two hours of practice we fished this area and caught three 4-pounders,” Foutz said. “We never caught another bass after that. We knew we were going to live or die in this area so that’s what we’ve done.”
 
The duo played it safe after catching 18 pounds by returning to the ramp at 11 a.m. and never moving until they weighed their fish at 2:30 p.m. It may be an unorthodox approach to preventing a disaster, but with a limit like that they knew there was no reason to risk it.

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