Dalton Middle 8th graders earn REACH college scholarship money - WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

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Dalton Middle 8th graders earn REACH college scholarship money

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Andrea Acosta Vasquez, Areianna Johnson, Santos Moreno, Milda Solis, and Aaliyah Medina Andrea Acosta Vasquez, Areianna Johnson, Santos Moreno, Milda Solis, and Aaliyah Medina
Dr. Phil Jones and State Sen. Charlie Bethel Dr. Phil Jones and State Sen. Charlie Bethel
State Sen. Charlie Bethel and Dalton Supt. Dr. Jim Hawkins State Sen. Charlie Bethel and Dalton Supt. Dr. Jim Hawkins
DALTON, GA (WRCB) -

Dalton Middle School hosted its first ever Realizing Educational Achievement Can Happen (REACH) Scholarship signing day. Five Dalton Middle School students signed for their scholarship during the ceremony. They were selected through an application and interview process by a judging panel including Senator Charlie Bethel; Julie Gallman, Dalton High School counselor; Tulley Johnson, Dalton Board of Education treasurer; Andy Meyer, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs at Dalton State College; and Barbara Ward, director of workforce development at the Greater Dalton Chamber of Commerce. 

REACH Georgia is a needs-based mentorship and scholarship program that begins in 8th grade. REACH Scholars are paired with a mentor and an academic coach through middle and high school. Scholars must maintain good grades (2.5 GPA), behavior and attendance through middle school and high school. Scholars who successfully complete the program and graduate from high school are awarded a $10,000 scholarship ($2,500/year) that can be used at any HOPE-eligible institution in Georgia. Majority of Georgia colleges are matching or double-matching this scholarship. The scholarship is in addition to any other grant or scholarship the student receives. 

The students who were selected are Andrea Acosta Vasquez, Areianna Johnson, Santos Moreno, Milda Solis, and Aaliyah Medina.

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