The Latest: Severe storms possible in final hours of voting - WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

The Latest: Severe storms possible in final hours of voting

Posted: Updated:

ATLANTA (AP) - The Latest on Georgia's primary voting (all times local):

8:15 a.m.

Forecasters say strong to severe storms will be possible in the final hours of voting in Georgia's primary elections.

The National Weather Service says the best chances for storms in the state will be after 4 p.m. Tuesday. Polls are scheduled to close at 7 p.m.

The weather service projects that the best chances for storms will be in a large part of north Georgia, including metro Atlanta, which is at slight risk of storms that could include frequent lightning and isolated tornadoes.

Parts of Middle Georgia and east Georgia - including Columbus, Macon and Augusta - will be at lesser risk of the storms.

7 a.m.

Polls have opened and voting has started in Georgia's primary elections.

Georgia has one of the largest delegate totals in the presidential race among 12 states voting in primaries.

Recent polling in the state shows Donald Trump leading Republicans and Hillary Clinton ahead in the Democratic race.

The polls will be open until 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Secretary of State Brian Kemp championed moving up Georgia's primary to March 1. He says Georgia's racial and political diversity makes it a key state for both Republican and Democratic presidential hopefuls, particularly with an earlier primary date.

5 a.m.

Voters in Georgia get their chance to influence the presidential race at the polls, with one of the largest delegate totals among 12 states voting in primaries.

Polls are open from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Georgia's deep-red status and high delegate count drew last-minute visits from multiple Republican candidates ahead of the Super Tuesday election. Democrats, meanwhile, know the state's large minority population makes black voters essential to winning a party primary in Georgia.

Recent polling in the state shows Donald Trump leading Republicans and Hillary Clinton ahead in the Democratic race.

Secretary of State Brian Kemp championed moving up Georgia's primary to March 1. He says Georgia's racial and political diversity makes it a key state for both Republican and Democratic presidential hopefuls, particularly with an earlier primary date.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Powered by Frankly