UPDATE: Kentucky clerk still refuses to issue same-sex marriage - WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

UPDATE: Kentucky clerk still refuses to issue same-sex marriage licenses

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Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis talks with David Moore after refusing him and David Ermold a marriage license. AP photo Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis talks with David Moore after refusing him and David Ermold a marriage license. AP photo

UPDATE: MOREHEAD, KY (AP) - The latest on a Kentucky county clerk who has refused to issue same-sex marriage licenses (all times local):

9:40 a.m.

The husband of a Kentucky county clerk who's refusing to issue gay marriage licenses despite a U.S. Supreme Court ruling says his wife is committed to her faith and is "standing for God."

Joe Davis arrived at the Rowan County courthouse Tuesday morning to check on his wife, clerk Kim Davis, shortly after she again denied the licenses to several couples.

Joe Davis says his wife has received death threats, and the couple changed their phone number. But he says he's not afraid, and he believes in the Second Amendment.

He said: "I'm an old redneck hillbilly, that's all I've got to say. Don't come knocking on my door."

On Monday, the Supreme Court declined to intervene, leaving Kim Davis no legal grounds to refuse to grant licenses. A district judge could now hold her in contempt, which can carry steep fines or jail time.

Joe Davis compared his wife to the biblical figures Paul and Silas, sent to prison and rescued by God.

He pointed to the gay rights protesters gathered on the courthouse lawn and said: "They want us to accept their beliefs and their ways. But they won't accept our beliefs and our ways."

9:05 a.m.

The office of a defiant county clerk in Kentucky has denied a marriage license to another gay couple.

On Tuesday morning, James Yates and Will Smith Jr. marched into Rowan County clerk Kim Davis' office. It was their fifth attempt to obtain a marriage license, and they once again were turned away.

They left red-eyed and shaking, and declined to talk to reporters gathered at the office.

Davis says her office is continuing to deny marriage licenses to gay couples "under God's authority."

She stopped issuing licenses the day the U.S. Supreme Court legalized gay marriage.

On Monday, the Supreme Court declined to intervene in the case, leaving Davis no legal grounds to refuse to grant licenses. A district judge could now hold her in contempt, which can carry steep fines or jail time.

8:40 a.m.

After a defiant county clerk in Kentucky refused to issue marriage licenses to gay couples despite a U.S. Supreme Court ruling, law enforcement authorities have cleared out the office of the hundreds of people packed inside to support both sides of the issue.

The sheriff's office in Rowan County told clerk Kim Davis' supporters and gay rights activists to leave on Tuesday morning.

The two groups lined up on either side of the courthouse entrance to chant at each other.

David Ermold has been rejected by Davis' office four times. He said: "I feel like I've been humiliated on such a national level."

He hugged David Moore, his partner of 17 years. They cried as Davis's supporters marched by shouting, "Stand firm."

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to intervene in the case, leaving Davis no legal grounds to refuse to grant licenses. A district judge could now hold her in contempt, which can carry steep fines or jail time

The rejected couples' supporters called the American Civil Liberties Union, which filed the lawsuit on their behalf. They asked that their attorneys file to have Davis held in contempt.

Randy Smith, leading the group supporting Davis, says he knows following their instruction to "stand firm" might mean Davis goes to jail on contempt charges.

He said: "But at the end of the day, we have to stand before God, which has higher authority than the Supreme Court."

8:20 a.m.

A county clerk in Kentucky who is continuing to deny marriage licenses to gay couples says she's doing so "under God's authority."

Rowan County clerk Kim Davis emerged from her office Tuesday morning after some couples were denied the licenses. She asked David Moore and David Ermold, who've been rejected four times, to leave. They refused, surrounded by reporters and cameras.

Ermold said: "We're not leaving until we have a license."

Davis responded: "Then you're going to have a long day."

Davis' supporters whooped from the back of the room: "Praise the Lord" and "stand your ground."

Others shouted that Davis is a bigot and told her: "Do your job."

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to intervene in the case, leaving Davis no legal grounds to refuse to grant licenses to gay couples. A district judge could now hold her in contempt, which can carry steep fines or jail time.

8:10 a.m.

A defiant county clerk in Kentucky has again refused to issues marriage licenses to same-sex couples despite a ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court.

On Tuesday morning, as Rowan County clerk Kim Davis' office opened, two couples were denied licenses.

A deputy clerk told April Miller and Karen Roberts, who walked into the office trailed by dozens of television cameras, that no licenses would be issued and refused to make Davis available.

A second couple, David Moore and David Ermold, rejected a fourth time, are demanding to speak with Davis.

Ermold shouted: "Tell her to come out and face the people she's discriminating against."

Davis is in her office, with the door and the blinds closed.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to intervene in the case, leaving Davis no legal grounds to refuse to grant licenses to gay couples. A district judge could now hold her in contempt, which can carry steep fines or jail time.

4:30 a.m.

Gay couples in a Kentucky county are expected at the courthouse door Tuesday morning after the Supreme Court ruled against a defiant clerk who has refused to hand out marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

The court rejected Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis' last-ditch appeal for a delay in her case Monday. On Tuesday morning, she'll have to choose whether to issue marriage licenses, or continue to refuse them and risk being fined or even possibly jailed.

Davis stopped issuing licenses the day the U.S. Supreme Court legalized gay marriage. A federal judge ordered her to issue them, and an appeals court upheld that decision. Still, she's turned away couples again and again.

The Supreme Court declined to intervene, leaving her no legal grounds to refuse.


PREVIOUS STORY: MOREHEAD, KY (AP) - The Supreme Court ruled against the county clerk who refused to issue gay marriage licenses, leaving her with perhaps her toughest decision yet: Hand out licenses or risk potential fines or even possible jail time.

The moment of truth comes Tuesday morning when Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis opens her office doors. She appears to have run out of legal options after the high court denied her last-ditch appeal late Monday.

Davis has steadfastly refused to issue the licenses, saying her deeply held Christian beliefs don't let her endorse gay marriages. Her attorney said she would pray overnight and understands the consequences either way.

"Wow, wow, wow, I can't believe it, we might finally be able to get a license," said April Miller, who's been denied a gay marriage license twice. "I don't know if she'll stand her ground and deny licenses. But I guess we'll find out."

Davis stopped issuing all marriage licenses in the days after U.S. Supreme Court legalized gay marriage across the nation. Two gay couples and two straight couples sued her, arguing that she must fulfill her duties as an elected official despite her personal religious faith. A federal judge ordered her to issue the licenses, and an appeals court upheld that decision. Her lawyers with the Liberty Counsel filed a last-ditch appeal to the Supreme Court on Friday, asking that they grant her "asylum for her conscience."

Justice Elena Kagan, who oversees the 6th district, referred Davis' request to the full court, which denied the stay without comment.

If Davis continues to turn away couples, they can ask a judge to hold her in contempt of court, which can carry steep fines or jail time.

Dan Canon, an attorney representing the couples, said he hopes Davis will simply hand his clients licenses Tuesday, and the controversy will end with that. Davis behind bars is not an outcome they are hoping for, he said.

"But if she continues to defy the court's order, we cannot let that continue unaddressed," he said Monday night.

As the clock wound down for Davis on Monday, the tension intensified between dueling groups of protesters outside her office window on the courthouse lawn.

Hexie Mefford has stood on the lawn waving a flag nearly every day for more than two months. The flag is fashioned after Old Glory, but with a rainbow instead of the red and white bars.

Mike Reynolds, a Christian protesting in Davis' defense, shouted at her that he found the flag offensive: He is an Army veteran, he complained, and they had desecrated the American flag. The two groups roared at each other. Davis' supporters called on the activists to repent; the activists countered that their God loves all.

It was a marked difference from the cordial protests that unfolded there every day since Davis declared she would issue no licenses.

Rachelle Bombe has sat there every day, wearing rainbow colors and carrying signs that demand marriage equality. One particularly hot day, Davis, the woman she was there to protest against, worried Bombe would get overheated and offered her a cold drink. In turn, Bombe said she's checked in on Davis, whose lawyer says she's received death threats and hate mail, to make sure she's holding up despite the difficult circumstances.

"She's a very nice lady, I like her a lot," Bombe said of Davis. "We're on the opposite sides of this, but it's not personal."

On Monday, Davis' supporters stood on the grass and sang "I am a Child of God."

The marriage equality activists chimed in after each refrain: "So are we."

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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