Parents who lost children to violence create a growing group in - WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

Parents who lost children to violence create a growing group in Chattanooga

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CHATTANOOGA, TN (WRCB) -

People gathered at Booker T. Washington State Park on Thursday all share a common heartbreak. They are parents or family members of a person killed by violence in Chattanooga.

Brenda Johnson lost her sun to gun violence five years ago. Johnson hopes coming together with other families in the same situtaion will help her heal.

"And I still have a problem dealing with it today, I just think that i'm going to see him again, I'm going to see him walking down the street," Johnson said.

Brenda Johnson's only son was shot and killed in a drive-by shooting in April of 2010. Pictures of her son Michael are all that she has left.

"I really really miss him so much. That's just like a part of you gone, my baby," Johnson said.

20-year old Michael Johnson had just gotten back from a family vacation and was at a friend's house on East 27th street the night he died.

"From my understanding he was sitting on the porch, and someone drove by and shot him in the head, once," his mother said.

Channel 3 aired Micheal's murder as part of a Crimestoppers report a month later, hoping police would get a tip to help find the person responsible for his death.
    
Five years later, the case has never been solved and is now a part of the District Attorney's Cold Case file.

"It was gang-related, I'm probably sure of that," Johnson said.

 Johnson still holds onto hope that one day she will know her son's killer.

"I still grieve and I still think about him, I miss him so much," she said.

Johnson is a member of "Healing From Both Sides," a growing group for those who have lost a child due to violence in Chattanooga.
    
She says being with others who have the same pain might help the healing process.

"I don't want anybody else to lose a child and have to go through everyday without your child, just wondering if you done something wrong or could you have done something more," Johnson said.

This group is calling themselves Healing From Both Sides because the parents of people who might have caused some of this violence and committed the crimes are also welcome to attend.

Johson says those families are also in pain and have lost a child to violence and they are welcome to heal together.

Johnson says they want to plan monthly events and impact more families in their communitiy.

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