US schools keep trying wrong fixes to deter school shootings, ex - WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

US schools keep trying wrong fixes to deter school shootings, experts say

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Demonstrating the use of a bulletproof whiteboard to protect a teacher. Researchers who study school shootings say the nation has done the wrong things, again and again, to prevent these rare but frightening events we call school shootings Demonstrating the use of a bulletproof whiteboard to protect a teacher. Researchers who study school shootings say the nation has done the wrong things, again and again, to prevent these rare but frightening events we call school shootings

By Bill Dedman
Investigative Reporter, NBC News

It happened after Columbine, after Virginia Tech, and after Newtown, too. After every massacre in a school, Americans grasp at quick cures. Let's install metal detectors and give guns to teachers. Let's crack down on troublemakers, weeding out kids who fit the profile of a gunman. Let's buy bulletproof whiteboards for the students to scurry behind, or train kids to throw erasers or cans of soup at an attacker.

Researchers who study school shootings say the nation has done the wrong things, again and again, to prevent these rare but frightening events. And when more promising measures that address the real causes of school shootings are tried, the money has ridden a rollercoaster, rising a year after a major attack, then falling as memories fade. Only one out of five schools currently gets money for one of the Obama administration's signature programs to reduce school shootings.

"Many of the school safety and security measures deployed in response to school shootings have little research support," concluded a 2010 research article in Educational Researcher, "What Can Be Done About School Shootings?: A Review of the Evidence." The researchers called the widely adopted policies of zero-tolerance discipline and student profiling "unsound practices."

The problem, the researchers say, is that the nation hasn't paid attention to actual research about how school shootings unfold.

School shooters don't "snap" or "go crazy." They have serious grievances, and they plan their attacks. Many felt bullied, persecuted, or injured by others. They engaged in behaviors that caused other students and adults to think they needed help. They showed difficulty coping with significant losses or personal failures. They told others about their plan. And they had access to weapons.

These patterns point to a different set of preventive measures. Instead of trying to put metal detectors at every door, which do little more than ensure that the operator of the metal detector gets shot first, schools need to do the more difficult work of creating schools where bullying is not allowed, where grievances are dealt with quickly, where students feel safe speaking up about a student they're concerned about, where students feeling suicidal have someone to talk with. And at home, guns need to be under lock and key.

Paying attention to the evidence
A landmark study in 2002 by the U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Department of Education, examining the facts of 37 school shootings, identified patterns contradicting the public perception of a loner who "just snapped":

  • Incidents of targeted violence at school are rarely sudden, impulsive acts.
  • Many attackers felt bullied, persecuted, or injured by others prior to the attack.
  • Most attackers engaged in some behavior, prior to the incident, that caused concern or indicated a need for help.
  • Most attackers were known to have difficulty coping with significant losses or personal failures. Many had considered or attempted suicide.
  • Most attackers did not threaten their targets directly prior to advancing the attack.
  • There is no accurate or useful "profile" of students who engage in targeted school violence. Some come from good homes, some from bad. Some have good grades, some bad.
  • Most attackers had access to and had used weapons prior to the attack.
  • Prior to most incidents, other people knew about the attacker's idea or plan, and often other students were involved.

What steps should schools take?
The researchers urged that schools take the following steps: 

  • Assess the school's emotional climate.
  • Emphasize the importance of listening in schools.
  • Adopt a strong, but caring stance against the code of silence.
  • Prevent, and intervene in, cases of bullying.
  • Involve all members of the school community in planning, creating and sustaining a school culture of safety and respect.
  • Develop trusting relationships between each student and at least one adult at school.
  • Create of mechanisms for developing and sustaining safe school climates.

The researchers acknowledge that these steps are not a cure-all and will not prevent every incident. The Newtown shooter, for example, 20-year-old Adam Lanza, wasn't like the rest. He was an adult, rather than a current student at the school he attacked. But these preventive measures fit most of the cases.

The White House response to Newtown
The Obama administration's public response to the killing of 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., was mostly to push for gun-control legislation. Newtown became a debate about guns, and the president got none of his gun controls through Congress: no background checks, no limitations on military-style weapons or high-capacity magazines.

Quietly, the administration proposed this year a list of school safety measures that are closer to those recommended a decade earlier by researchers. Still, the programs were wrapped up inside a gun-control initiative, part of the administration's "Now Is the Time" initiative "to protect our children and communities by reducing gun violence."

Key elements of the Obama plan for school safety:

  • Ensure that every school and college has a comprehensive emergency management plan, using best practices for training and emergency drills.
  • Create a safe and positive school climate, with programs to address bullying, drug use, poor attendance foster conflict resolution and violence prevention.
  • Make sure that students and young adults up to age 25 can get treatment for mental health issues.
  • Add up to 1,000 counselors and police officers in schools — called school resource officers — and help schools buy safety equipment and train crisis intervention teams.

And on Tuesday, Vice President Biden met with parents from Newtown, as he announced funding for mental health treatment programs. (See the video below from NBC Nightly News.)

This time, administration officials suggest, the right responses to school attacks will be sustained.

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