Police crack down on dangerous driving in Hands Across the Borde - WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

Police crack down on dangerous driving in Hands Across the Border

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CHATTANOOGA, TN (WRCB) -

State Troopers and police are cracking down on dangerous driving this Labor Day weekend. Agencies from six states, including Tennessee and Georgia, team up for Hands Across the Border to promote safer roads with a simple message.

Drive sober or get pulled over.

Drive drunk or get nailed.

Click it or ticket.

We know the catch phrases.

"We want everyone to buckle up, slow down and don't drink and drive," said Ft. Oglethorpe Police Captain Gary McConathy.

Officers like Ft. Oglethorpe Police Captain Gary McConathy are looking to hammer down the bottom line.

"Just because you leave one state, don't expect to get a free ride when you're speeding, drinking and driving or not buckling up in another state," he said.

Officers and troopers say there's more work to do keeping roads safe on a holiday infamous for dangerous driving.

"When dinner is done and homework is complete are prayers are said that moms and dads can put their children to bed, kiss them goodnight and live to see another day... That's what our goal is," he said.

Thirteen people died on Georgia roadways last Labor Day with no deaths reported in Tennessee.

Last year, Georgia State Patrol recorded 387 Labor Day Holiday crashes, issued 6,000 tickets and 265 DUIs.

TUESDAY'S SATURATION NETS ARRESTS

Police, deputies and troopers from Tennessee and Georgia spent two hours Tuesday night writing tickets and making arrests.

"Not your typical Friday and Saturday night that we associate with dangerous driving and drinking and driving," he said.

But even on this relatively slow night, Georgia police made 22 arrests, nabbing three people for DUI and six for drugs like marijuana and even meth. They set up a cluster of checkpoints on Rossville Blvd from 8-10 p.m. Tuesday.

Tennessee had one checkpoint not far from Georgia's by the border and wrote 61 tickets with one DUI.

ROAD FATALITIES DOWN IN TENNESSEE

The good news for Tennesseans: road deaths are down 8 percent from this time in 2012. Motorcycle deaths are down 10 percent, but pedestrian deaths are up 30 percent.

If the 54 fewer deaths in Tennessee this year, 36 are accounted for in the Chattanooga district. That means 66 percent of the state's fatality decrease has come from Chattanooga.

"People are buckling up in Chattanooga so in reality our number of fatality crashes are coming down in the Chattanooga area," said THP Lt. John Harmon.

The Tennessee Highway Patrol told Channel 3 they hope to stay below 900 roadway fatalities in 2013.

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