Tracking Sandy's aftermath - minute by minute - WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

Tracking Sandy's aftermath - minute by minute

Posted:
Floodwaters from Hurricane Sandy rush into the Port Authority Trans-Hudson's (PATH) Hoboken, New Jersey station through an elevator shaft. Floodwaters from Hurricane Sandy rush into the Port Authority Trans-Hudson's (PATH) Hoboken, New Jersey station through an elevator shaft.

Updated as new information becomes available from the AP and NBC News


3:54 pm -  At Heathrow in London, there are more flight cancellations today than there were yesterday.

It's been this sort of snowballing effect and the ultimate effect has been thousands of Americans not only stranded here but in airports around the world and thousands of other people stuck in the U.S., unable to leave.

3:08 pm - The home of New York congressman Bob Turner was one of about 80 in the Breezy Point neighborhood of Queens that burned down during the onslaught of Hurricane Sandy.

The Republican lawmaker said in a statement that, along with many other Breezy Point residents, he had lost his home. He expressed gratitude that he and his family were safe after the destructive storm.

2:58 pm - The U.S. death toll from Sandy has climbed to 35, many of the victims killed by falling trees.

The full extent of the damage in New Jersey, where the storm roared ashore Monday night with hurricane-force winds of 80 mph, was unclear. Police and fire officials, some with their own departments flooded, fanned out to rescue hundreds.

2:56 pm - Just in: President Obama will travel to New Jersey tomorrow to survey damage from Sandy.

2:32 pm - A tidal surge triggered by superstorm Sandy sent water overflowing a riverbank and gushing out of storm drains, quickly swamping two northern New Jersey towns and setting off a frantic rescue of people stranded in houses and rooftops.

Authorities said the body of a man was recovered from the river during the Monday overnight rescues in a flooded area just upstream. The rescue work continued into Tuesday afternoon.

2:10 pm - More than 8.2 million people across the East were without power. Airlines canceled more than 15,000 flights around the world, and it could be days before the mess is untangled and passengers can get where they're going.

The storm also disrupted the presidential campaign with just a week to go before Election Day.

1:01 pm - The New York Stock Exchange says U.S. stock markets will be open for business on Wednesday

12:36 pm - The massive storm that pummeled the East killed 10 people in New York City, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Tuesday, but he offered no firm timeline on when power would be restored to hundreds of thousands of people or when the city's flooded subway system would be running again.

"This was a devastating storm, maybe the worst that we have ever experienced," he said.

12:02 pm - In Long Beach, New York, one death has now been confirmed in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, as the area also deals with widespread water outages and other storm related damage.

The boardwalk at Long Beach was partly covered in sand and some of the actual boards were destroyed.

11:32 am -  A crane boom hangs precariously from what is slated to be Manhattan's tallest residential tower in midtown New York City. Live stream here

11:01 am - Phone and cable companies are still assessing the damage in the storm-hit areas of the East Coast amid widespread reports of phone outages in flooded areas.
    
Cablevision, which serves parts of Long Island, New York City and New Jersey, says it's experiencing widespread outages due to the loss of power. Verizon Communications, the biggest phone company in the region, says some facilities in downtown Manhattan are flooded, shutting down phone and Internet service. The company doesn't yet know the extent of outages in New Jersey, which bore the brunt of the storm.
    
AT&T says there are "issues" in hard-hit areas, and it's in the early stages of checking for damage and restoring service.

10:56 am - NY Gov. Andrew Cuomo briefs the public on clean-up and recovery efforts in New York in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Live stream here

10:33 am - Superstorm Sandy is winding down and inching its way inland, leaving at least 17 people in seven states dead and more than 7 million power outages in its wake.
    
New York was one of the hardest hit areas when an unprecedented 13-foot surge of seawater - 3 feet above the previous record - caused the worst damage in the 108-year history of the city's subway system. It also forced 200 patients to be evacuated from one hospital.
    
The National Hurricane Center in Miami says the massive storm is moving across Pennsylvania and is expected to take a sharp turn into western New York by tomorrow morning.
    
The Midwest also is bracing for Sandy. Chicago officials are warning residents to stay away from the Lake Michigan shore as the city prepares for winds of up to 60 miles an hour and waves exceeding 24 feet well into tomorrow.

10:00 am - New Jersey's Gov. Chris Christie discusses the devastating damage from Hurricane Sandy and ongoing relief efforts. Live stream here

9:44 am - Superstorm Sandy is winding down and inching its way inland, leaving at least 17 people in seven states dead and more than 7 million power outages in its wake. 

New York was one of the hardest hit areas when an unprecedented 13-foot surge of seawater - 3 feet above the previous record - caused the worst damage in the 108-year history of the city's subway system. It also forced 200 patients to be evacuated from one hospital. 

Authorities are trying to rescue 800 people in a northern New Jersey town after a berm overflowed.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami says the massive storm is moving across Pennsylvania and is expected to take a sharp turn into western New York by Wednesday morning. 

The Midwest also is bracing for Sandy. Chicago officials are warning residents to stay away from the Lake Michigan shore as the city prepares for winds of up to 60 miles an hour and waves exceeding 24 feet well into Wednesday.

9:41 am - The Washington area's Metro subway and bus system will reopen at 2 p.m. after making it through the deadly superstorm that's bringing destruction to the East Coast.

Metro announced Tuesday morning that once the system reopens, trains and buses will operate less frequently than usual for a weekday. They'll run at what Metro calls "Sunday service intervals."  Metro plans to resume normal service for the Wednesday morning commute.

Spokesman Dan Stessel says it appears the transit system weathered the storm well. He says there was some water infiltration but no significant flooding and few downed trees.

Metro is the nation's second-busiest transit system after New York City based on weekly ridership.

9:37 am - Sandy has grounded well over 10,000 flights across the Northeast and the globe, and it could be days before some passengers can get where they're going.

According to the flight-tracking service FlightAware, more than 13,500 flights had been canceled for Monday and Tuesday, almost all related to the storm. By early Tuesday morning, more than 500 flights scheduled for Wednesday also were canceled.

Major carriers such as American Airlines, United and Delta canceled all flights into and out of three area airports in New York, the nation's busiest airspace. About one-quarter of all U.S. flights travel to or from New York airports each day. So cancellations here can dramatically impact travel in other cities.

Delays rippled across the U.S., affecting travelers in cities from San Francisco to Atlanta. Others attempting to fly out of Europe and Asia also were stuck.

9:03 am - President Barack Obama has declared a major disaster for New York City and Long Island.

  
Superstorm Sandy is marching slowly inland after leaving at least 17 dead in its march up the East Coast.
    
Millions of people are without power or mass transit and many areas are flooded.
    
9:02 am - A huge fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses in a flooded neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens.
    
More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire in the Breezy Point section, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire.
    
A fire department spokesman says one firefighter suffered a minor injury and was taken to a hospital. Two civilians suffered minor injuries and were treated at the scene.
    
Officials say the fire was reported around 11 p.m. Monday in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through the city earlier.
    
The neighborhood sits on the Rockaway peninsula jutting into the Atlantic Ocean.
    
Hundreds of people are being evacuated after a levee broke in a northern New Jersey town today.
    
Bergen County executive chief of staff Jeanne Baratta tells The Record newspaper the entire town of Moonachie is under water and as many as 1,000 people could need to be evacuated.
    
Baratta says people in a trailer park have had to climb on the roofs of their trailers to await rescue.
    
There are no reports of injuries or deaths.
    
9:01 am - Atlantic City's mayor says he would love nothing better than to confront New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie "mano a mano."
    
Speaking on NBC's "Today" show Tuesday, Mayor Lorenzo Langford disputed Christie's criticism that Langford erred by allowing people to shelter on the barrier island rather than moving them inland.
    
Langford says the governor was either misinformed or ill-advised.
    
The mayor says while most Atlantic City residents fled the island, some decided to stay. Langford says the city had a contingency plan in place for those who didn't heed the warning to evacuate.
    
Langford says it's reprehensible that the governor would try to play politics out of a serious situation.
    
Speaking on "Today," Christie said his "anger has turned to sympathy for those folks."

    
9:00 am - A blizzard warning covers a large part of West Virginia as snow and high winds blow over Appalachia on the edges of superstorm Sandy.
    
The National Weather Service says a foot and more of snow was reported in lower elevations of West Virginia, where most towns and roads are. High elevations in the mountains were getting more than two feet.
    
More than 128,000 customers in West Virginia were without power.
    
Authorities closed more than 45 miles of Interstate 68 on either side of the West Virginia-Maryland state line because of blizzard conditions and stuck cars.
    
The State Highway Administration in Maryland says the higher elevations in the western state have gotten more than a foot of snow since Monday afternoon, and it was still snowing at 5 a.m. today.

9:00 am - Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett holds a news briefing at the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency in Harrisburg, Pa. to give an update on the statewide impacts of Hurricane Sandy. Live video stream here

8:55 am - The Post and Courier of Charleston, SC reported that as the storm eroded between 3 and 5 feet of beach as it moved north.
    
Personnel from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have been checking for beach damage.
    
The damage could increase the cost of a planned federal project to rebuild the beach with sand.
    
The crops hopes to find out in February whether the federal budget will contain the almost $20 million needed for the beach renourishment work.
  

8:39 am - A state-by-state look at the East Coast superstorm:
    
The massive storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy slammed into the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing at least 18 deaths. Here's a snapshot of what is happening, state by state.

CAROLINAS
    
North Carolina Gov. Beverly Perdue expanded a state of emergency to western North Carolina, which could see a foot of snow. A woman who was pulled from the Atlantic after abandoning a tall ship died. Power outages: 6,600.
    
CONNECTICUT
    
The Long Island Sound flooded roads as the storm toppled trees and power lines Two people died, including an Easton firefighter who was killed when a tree fell on his truck. Power outages: more than 615,000.
    
DELAWARE
    
Nearly all residents of flood-prone coastal communities in Kent County heeded calls to evacuate. The Rehoboth Beach and Dewey Beach resort communities were flooded. Power outages: more than 45,000.

8:30 am - Gov. Dannel Malloy of Connecticut holds a news conference to brief the public on relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. Live stream here

7:45 am - In Moonachie, NJ, officials say the levee broke and left about 5 feet of water in the streets within 45 minutes. 

The police and fire departments are flooded.  Officials are using boats to try to rescue about 800 people living in a trailer park.

There are no reports of injuries or deaths.

 

Powered by WorldNow
Can't find what you're looking for?

WRCB-TV
900 Whitehall Road
Chattanooga, TN 37405
(423) 267-5412

WRCB Jobs EEO | FCC Public Files

Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and WRCB. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.